Should I File a Multi-Class Federal Trademark Application?

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) allows trademark applicants to include several goods and/or services spanning multiple classes on a single trademark application submission. There are both advantages and disadvantages to including multiple classes within one trademark application; Fundamentally, the key question an applicant must ask him/herself is what am I ultimately planning to sell under the banner of my trademark? Remember, one does not broadly own the categorical and exclusive right to a trademark; instead, a person’s right to a trademark is limited specifically to the goods services sold under the banner of the trademark. When submitting a trademark application to the USPTO, it is critical to balance the competing interest of covering all goods/services which are necessary to encompass the Brand without spending an excessive amount on government fees for classes of goods services which will never be actualized. This article will consider some of

Policy Aside, Covid No Longer Justifies Title 42

It’s understandable that 19 states want to prevent the Biden administration from ending the Trump-era Title 42 Covid emergency immigration expulsions of people who are certainly eligible to apply for asylum and may very well prevail. And there is a pretty good chance that the Biden administration doesn’t so much want to end Title 42 expulsions, which would relieve the pressure to some extent at the border from cities and states dealing with the massive influx of immigrants in need of food, housing and care.

But it’s politically untenable for Biden not to do so, given his base of support, even if the calls for compassion conflict with the physical realities of far more bodies than beds. So Biden had to end the program in April 2022, even though there is no plan for dealing with the consequences, which fall heaviest on southern border states. Red states.

On petition for

Short Take: Congressman-ish Santos | Simple Justice

I asked a neighbor of mine who had a Santos sign on his property what he thought. George Santos was elected my congressman, having beaten the Democratic nominee, Robert Zimmerman, pretty handily, replacing Tommy Suozzi as our representative. Why, I asked. He wasn’t the Democrat, was the answer my neighbor gave me. But did you know anything about Santos, who he was, what he stood for? “Nah. Who cared? He wasn’t the Democrat.”

As it turned out, George Santos wasn’t a lot of things.

Long Island Rep.-elect George Santos came clean to The Post on Monday, admitting that he lied on the campaign trail about his education and work experience — but insisting that the controversy won’t deter him from serving out his two-year term in Congress.

“I am not a criminal,” Santos said at one point during his exclusive interview. “This [controversy] will not deter me from having

A Tangled Webb | Simple Justice

With a tip from Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a cosmologist at the University of New Hampshire who described herself as “Jewish. queer/agender/woman/she” with an overactive twitter account seeking out and attacking people for their failure to live up to her woke demands, an article in Science accused James Webb of being unworthy of having a telescope named after him.

But as the telescope neared completion, criticism flared. In 2015, Matthew Francis, a science journalist, wrote an article for Forbes titled “The Problem With Naming Observatories for Bigots.” He wrote that Mr. Webb led the anti-gay purge at the State Department and that he had testified of his contempt for gay people. He credited Dr. Prescod-Weinstein with tipping him off, and she in turn tweeted his article and attacked Mr. Webb as a “homophobe.”

As it turned out, Webb wasn’t the person who did this and Prescod-Weinstein was simply factually wrong.

Celebrating A Beloved Christmas Song

Esau McCaulley writes of hearing the “Christmas spiritual ‘Sweet Little Jesus Boy‘” when he was a young boy in his grandmother’s kitchen. Great. And it would be totally fine if he just really liked it, or even kinda liked it, or even just remembered it. But that’s not lofty enough to set us up for where he’s taking us.

“Sweet Little Jesus Boy” was, in my childhood imagination, a connection to the faith of my ancestors, a song composed in the hush harbors where enslaved people gathered clandestinely to celebrate the birth of our savior. The song fought for supremacy in Black church Christmas services alongside hymns like “Go Tell It on the Mountain” and “Mary Had a Baby.”

See what happened there? It went from a song to a cause. It went from a Christmas spiritual to the embodiment of black oppression